Microsoft returns Hot Reload to the .NET SDK

Victoria D. Doty

After feedback from the community at large, Microsoft has reversed itself over the removal of the Hot Reload capability from the .NET SDK repository.

In an October 23 blog post about .NET Hot Load support via the CLI, Microsoft’s Scott Hunter, director of program management for .NET, apologized for the removal. “We made a mistake in executing on our decision and took longer than expected to respond back to the community. We have approved the pull request to re-enable this code path and it will be in the GA build of the .NET 6 SDK.”

Hot Reload enables developers to modify an app’s managed source code while the application is running, with no need to manually pause or hit a breakpoint. The capability was previewed in Visual Studio 2019, with the full experience to arrive in the planned Visual Studio 2022 release, due as a production release on November 8. Microsoft’s .NET 6 software development platform also is expected in that timeframe.

Hunter said that with time getting short for the release of .NET 6 and Visual Studio 2022, Microsoft chose to focus on bringing Hot Reload to Visual Studio 2022 first. In executing this plan, source code inadvertently was deleted instead of just not invoking the code path. Hunter said Microsoft “underestimated the number of developers that are dependent upon this capability in their environments across scenarios, and how the CLI was being used alongside Visual Studio to drive inner loop productivity by many.” He also said the vast majority of .NET developers are using Visual Studio, and Microsoft wanted to make sure the IDE delivers the best experience for .NET 6.

Microsoft on October 20 had posted a blog on Hot Reload progress and Visual Studio 2022, emphasizing use of Hot Reload with Visual Studio 2022. The blog also cited unsupported scenarios for Hot Reload including apps built using F# or those targeting .NET Native.

Copyright © 2021 IDG Communications, Inc.

Next Post

Why you should use a microservice architecture

Your application is large. You have many customers, and they make good use of your many features and capabilities. You have a large catalog of products, and your store is big and feature-rich. You are doing well. Except, you are having problems. Your application crashes too often. Your developers are […]

Subscribe US Now